Downtown Bartlesville metallic facades eliminated, originals restored

The constructing at 309-311 S. Dewey Ave. previous to the Dec. 9 work to take away its metallic facade.

Work to take away metallic facades on two downtown buildings will quickly make the 300 block of Dewey Avenue one of many solely ones with absolutely authentic lower stone facades remaining and visual.

On Jan. 1, or shortly thereafter, work will start to take away the metallic facades on the constructing containing Uptown Sew, 316 S. Dewey Ave., and Cooper Herrington Furnishings, 318 S. Dewey Ave.

The venture, led by the Bartlesville Redevelopment Belief Authority (BRTA), comes shortly after the Dec. 9 elimination of the metallic facade on the constructing at 309-311 S. Dewey Ave.

“This block would be the just one with all authentic facades. … The 300 block of Dewey will probably be thought-about some of the historic. You’ll have the ability stroll from the Value Tower from one historic constructing to extra historic buildings in Bartlesville,” BRTA Director Chris Wilson stated.

The upcoming work is being accomplished, partially, on the request of the constructing house owners. Cooper Herrington Furnishings is closing Dec. 31, and the constructing is underneath contract to be offered.

“As soon as metallic facades come down, we don’t but know what sort of extra work will probably be wanted,” Wilson stated.

The result of Dec. 9 work to remove the metal facade on the building at 309-311 S. Dewey Ave.

The results of Dec. 9 work to take away the metallic facade on the constructing at 309-311 S. Dewey Ave.

The elimination of metallic facades on the constructing at 309-311 S. Dewey Ave. was extra purposeful — it’s being transformed into inexpensive housing due to a Hope IV Important Avenue Grant.

Previously the location of an insurance coverage firm, printing enterprise and a few flats, the constructing has been vacant for the reason that Eighties, Wilson stated.

Now, work has began to transform the downstairs into one ADA accessible house and two retail areas and the upstairs into six flats. The $1.2 million venture will probably be funded by the $500,000 grant, $108,000 of BRTA funds and the remaining will probably be funded by the developer.

“A part of that exact venture was to take away the metallic facade — for one factor, to make the flats extra usable. You don’t need to look out your window at a metallic grate. The opposite cause was they need to return to the historic look of the constructing,” Wilson stated.

This text initially appeared on Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise: Downtown Bartlesville metallic facades eliminated, originals restored